Special Populations & Educational Equity

Who are the Special Populations?

SPECIAL POPULATIONS STUDENTS:

  • Individuals with disabilities: an individual with any disability defined in Section 3 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12102);
  • Individuals from economically disadvantaged families, including low-income youth and adults;
  • English learner: a) A secondary school student who is an English learner as defined in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965; or b) an adult or out-of-school youth who has limited ability in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language and:
    1. whose native language is a language other than English, or
    2. who lives in a family environment or community in which a language other than English is the dominant language;
  • Single parents, including single pregnant women;
  • Out-of-workforce individuals: a person who is unemployed, underemployed, and experiencing difficulty obtaining or upgrading employment (includes displaced homemakers);
  • Homeless individuals: as described in section 725 of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11434a);
  • Youth who are in, or have aged out of, the foster care system;
  • Youth with a parent who:
    1. is a member of the armed forces (as such term is defined in section 101 (a)(4) of title 10, U.S.C.) and
    2. is on active duty (defined in section 101(d)(1) of such title);
  • Individuals preparing for nontraditional fields: nontraditional fields means occupations or fields of work, including careers in computer science, technology, and other emerging high skill occupations, for which individuals from one gender comprise less than 25 percent of the individuals employed in each such occupation or field of work.
What is Educational Equity?

The goal of educational equity is for all students to share an equal opportunity to learn and to achieve, regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, disability or gender. To provide all students a safe and equitable school environment is an on-going challenge to public school officials and the greater educational community.

Students Preparing for Nontraditional Fields

The term ‘nontraditional fields’ means occupations or fields of work, such as careers in computer science, technology, and other current and emerging high skill occupations, for which individuals from one gender comprise less than 25 percent of the individuals employed in each such occupation or field of work.  Examples of students preparing for nontraditional fields include girls pursuing engineering or construction careers, and boys pursuing nursing careers. 

What are Supplementary Services?

The term "supplementary services" means modification of curriculum, equipment, or classroom; supportive personnel; and instructional aids and devices.

Events/Dates

CTE Professional Development Conference Resource

National Equity Standards

Fostering maximum development of individual potential is what educational equity is all about. Designing plans and programs to enhance the achievement of all students, however, can be a daunting task. Fortunately, the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity has identified a set of ten essential system-building standards that can provide an equity compass for our schools.

The ten standards have been designed to ensure that when used collectively, equity permeates all aspects of the schooling process. They are most effective when integrated with existing academic and career development standards, but they can also be used as part of a school improvement plan focusing on those factors that support success for all students.

Each standard is accompanied by a series of indicators: specific elements essential to meeting that standard. Where appropriate, content standards for student knowledge and skill development have also been included. Thanks to the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity for this invaluable resource for schools committed to educational equity.

The Ten National Equity Standards

NDACTSNE/Special Populations Awards

Any NDACTSNE member may submit a nomination for these awards.  Please consider someone you may want to nominate and submit the appropriate application form.

NDACTSNE Outstanding Teacher of the Year

  • Must be a classroom teacher working with special needs students in career and technical education programming. University professors, administrative or guidance personnel are not eligible. Nominee must be a current NDACTSNE member as well as a current state affiliated association member.

NDACTSNE Outstanding Member of the Year

  • Must be a current member of NDACTSNE working with special needs students in career and technical education programming who has contributed to the growth and development of the NDACTSNE organization.

NDACTSNE Outstanding Direct Support Provider of the Year

  • Must be administrative or non-classroom personnel who have made a major contribution to the development and/or growth of career and technical special needs education. Nominees may include: local/area administrators of career and technical special needs programs, state administrators of career and technical special needs programs or CTE special needs teacher educators.

NDACTSNE Outstanding Indirect Support Provider of the Year

  • Friends of Career and Technical Special Needs Education who have made a major contribution to the development and/or growth of special needs education. Those being nominated for an award in this category MUST include: private employer, advisory committee member, state or national legislators, individual who has been unusually supportive of career and technical special needs education, or local school district administrator.

NDACTSNE

North Dakota Association of Career & Technical Special Needs Educators (NDACTSNE)

 

Contact Information